Australian Biography - Margaret Fulton

Shot Vision Audio In Point
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Fade up on opening sequence for Australian Biography. Title Australian Biography.

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Margaret at home.

Freeze frame at end of audio:
Super fades up:
Margaret Fulton
Born 1924
Cookery Writer

Margaret sync: Well, I was born in Nairn near Inverness, in the north of Scotland. A lovely part of Scotland, in October, 1924. Tenth of October, 1924. And I've since learnt I was born in the Year of the Rat, which actually tells me what my future is going to be. I'm always going to be surrounded by food.

Music

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School photo of Margaret as young girl.

Robin o/s: Where did you come in the family?

Margaret v/o: I was the - I'm the youngest. I'm the baby. Or I was the baby of the family.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: And it was lovely being the youngest of six children. We had three boys and three girls. And they all adored me, and they all loved me, and they all pampered me. And they all thought I was the sweetest baby and the loveliest little thing.

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Photo [FLS] Margaret as child holding dog

Margaret v/o: So I, I grew up being loved, which is a very nice...

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Photo [MS] Margaret as child holding dog

Margaret v/o: ...it's a very nice thing to do.

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Photo Family on ship

Robin o/s: Now when you were just three years old, your whole family came to Australia...

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Margaret

...and you settled in the little country town of Glen Innes. Did you fit in easily with the other children in the town?

Margaret sync: No, all my school life...

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Photo [MWS] Margaret standing on the shoulders of two young men. Pan down to second photo

Margaret v/o: ...I was called Scotch. Because I was a Scot. And I was always very different...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...to the children, because I wore a little - my father being a tailor - my little overcoats used to be like the little princesses, Princess Margaret and Princess...

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Photo [MWS] Margaret as young woman with friend

Margaret v/o: ...Elizabeth. No, I was always quite...

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Photo [WS] Margaret standing in front of bush cottage

... - I suppose I was always quite...

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Photo [FLS] Margaret standing in front of bush cottage

... different. Because I was a Scot. One of the turning...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...points in my life was when a rather aristocratic, for Australia, family had - I had overheard - they used to invite me to play with their children on a property out of Glen Innes. And I overheard them saying, "Oh, we like Margaret Fulton coming. She's the only child in the village that speaks so beautifully. And she's a good influence on our children." And I thought, oh what a terrible - I'm a village child, am I. And I then didn't want to play with these children. I wanted to go in and be with the cook, who was making lovely raised pies and that was the first time that I had seen very intricate cooking being done. Because this family had brought a cook out from England, and used to make all of the proper food that they had in England.

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Photo [MCU] Margaret as young woman

Margaret v/o: And I discovered this wonderful world.

Robin o/s: And how did you learn to cook?

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Margaret

Margaret sync: Well, when you're the youngest of a family of six and dinner's coming along, and say for a dessert you're having a custard, that custard has to be stirred. So guess who gets the job of stirring the custard? The youngest member of the family, who can just sit there and stir away. And you know you're not to let it get curdled, and you knew not to - you know, all of those things. I was taught to care, and watch, and you know, everything like that. Mother would sometimes send me down to the greengrocer to get some tomatoes, and if I bought back a squashy tomato, I had to take it back. Because you know, you can't use that. "Go back, Margaret, and learn to watch what you're doing." So at a very young age, I learnt that the first thing you had to do was to have good ingredients, to shop carefully, and to be careful.

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Photo [2S] Margaret at microphone in display kitchen

Robin o/s: After you left school, you went to Sydney and eventually trained as a home economist...

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Photo [WS] Home economist kitchen

...with the Gas Company. Did you stay long with the Gas Company?

Margaret v/o: Oh, too long.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: Very soon I was offered a job - or I was offered a job when, after the war when we started making pressure cookers. And Sir John Storey, who had been the head of the aircraft corporation, he got a whole lot of women to give their saucepans for the war. And that was for making aeroplanes. And then he was left with all these scrap saucepans, and he - they learnt about pressure cooking.

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Photo [CU] Margaret as young woman

Margaret v/o: So I got the job of selling pressure cookers to retail stores.

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Margaret. Slow zoom in to MCU

Margaret sync: And I was so naive, I was told if we could get orders six months ahead, it would help them with the supply of aluminium. So in all innocence I went off to, you know, leading retailers, and said, "Look, if you can give me an order for six months it would be such a help. And of course, these men who'd missed out on the job were laughing at this silly girl thinking she could get six month orders. And I got the six month orders and I came back. And said, "Yes, well they've done it." It is amazing what, when somebody believes in you...

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Photo [CU] Margaret as young woman smiling

Margaret v/o: what can happen, you know.

Robin o/s: But you left that job to get married.

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Photo [2S] Two young soldiers

What sort of a person was he that attracted you?

Margaret v/o: Oh, well he played the guitar and he sang. And oh, for a country girl, you know...

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Margaret sync: ...to have somebody that can strum away and sing moonlight becomes you, it goes with your hair. It was just lovely, you know.

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Photo [MLS] Two young soldiers standing by truck

Margaret v/o: It was silly as anything. It was the silliest reason for marrying. If I'd...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...when you go through life, and life's a bit of a ball, you don't - and you haven't really had any hitches, you don't think there's going to be a hitch in your life. You just think it's something you do.

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Photo [CU] Two young soldiers

Margaret v/o: And it was something I did. The wonderful thing that of course did...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...happen out of the marriage is I thought I'd leave him but I left him with a, I left him really with a surprise package.

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Photo [MWS] Margaret and others standing beside ship

Margaret v/o: My mother had died and I was going to Scotland with my father...

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Photo [detail of previous] Margaret and her father

...and I, travelling through the Great Australian Bight, on a big ship...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...I thought I was seasick. And I thought was still seasick when I got to Colombo, and went through. When I arrived in London, I was still seasick, and then I found that I was pregnant.

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Photo [MCU] Margaret with baby

Margaret v/o: And so although it seemed like tragedy at the time, it ended up being, you know, wonderful, because I've got the most...

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Photo [CU] Suzanne as teenager

...wonderful daughter who, you know, who's given me great happiness.

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Photo [MWS] Suzanne as baby with her father

Robin o/s: And so after you did divorce him, you were really bringing up your daughter...

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Margaret

...without a father. Was that difficult at the beginning, for you?

Margaret sync: No, it wasn't, because my sister was married to...

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Photo [MWS] Margaret with Suzanne as baby, and group of friends

Margaret v/o: ...an author, William Hatfield. And they had...

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Photo [detail of previous] Margaret with Suzanne and others

...a tiny, tiny wee cottage on the Hawkesbury River. And they said "Come up and live with us."

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Margaret

Margaret sync: And I shared a bedroom, you know, it was a tiny, tiny wee bedroom, that you could just squeeze between two single beds, and my daughter's cot, Suzanne's cot when into the space. But it was just a lovely, lovely period. Because my sister loved food. She loved, she loved, she had ducks that stayed up underneath certain pens. We used to do deals with the local fisherman. They would give us fish and we'd give them oranges from our orange trees. And we used to - my daughter Suzie was brought up, you know, on oysters from the foreshores. And then what we used to call spinach, and asparagus that used to grow wild. Food that used to grow on the foreshores.

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Archival. Boat on Hawkesbury

Margaret v/o: We used to go out in our little boat and row around and...

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Archival Boats on Hawkesbury

...do things.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: And when we got a good book by the one little lamp that we had, we used to take turns in reading the book to each other. It was a charming, marvellous existence. Even although we didn't have much money. But what you can do with a buoyant disposition and imagination and intelligence, and you know, hard work and milking the goats...

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Archival Hawkesbury River

Margaret v/o: ...and things like that, it was all - it was a...

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Photo [MS] Margaret with Suzanne on pier

...marvellous time.

Robin o/s: And so what was the next phase for you...

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Photo [CU] Margaret

...in terms of your career.

Margaret v/o: My career, I - the...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...job was a cookery editor for a women's magazine. And I went along and applied for the job. And a marvellous person interviewed me. It was Elizabeth...

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Photo [CU] Elizabeth Riddell

Margaret v/o: ...Riddell, you know, the famous Australian - she was the editor at the time. But...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...it started my career in newspapers and women's magazines, and writing about food. And I used to write the daftest things, you know. How to have a cocktail party.

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Photo [MS] Cocktail party

Margaret v/o: And I'd been to one, so I knew how to do it. And I also went to...

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Photo [CU] East Sydney Technical College

...East Sydney Tech had a food school.

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Archival WS Grounds of tech school

And a lot of the, the main...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...chef was, he'd cooked for the Shah of Persia, and he'd done, he was a marvellous chef.

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Photo [MCU] Margaret in kitchen

Margaret v/o: And it seemed awfully - I used to get so cross, thinking all I'm doing is cutting up vegetables. But what I came out with...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...was enormous skills with my knife, with my saucepans, with everything that I touched. Because I was working with a person who had reached the heights and was taking us...

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Photo [MS] Margaret basting kebabs

Margaret v/o: ...with him. And it was jut lovely.

Robin o/s: But after a while with the magazine, you moved to advertising.

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Photo [2S] Margaret with other woman tasting

Why advertising?

Margaret v/o: My clever...

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Photo [MS] Margaret cooking in electric fry pan

Margaret v/o: ...brother in law, William Hatfield, had said "Margaret, go where the money is.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: It's the advertising that keeps a newspaper or a magazine going. Go closer to the source of money." And of course, it's true, you know, without advertising going into these women's magazines or any kind of magazine, any radio station or television station, it's the money that pays the wages. The money from the advertising that pays the wages. And by that stage I thought, oh, the - yes, I'm being, you know, worldly wise, and I'm going to where the money is. So I went for that. And also it's that wonderful feeling of youth, of try something new.

Robin o/s: And you were actually quite successful in advertising, but nevertheless...

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Photo [MWS] Margaret and group of women at table. Zoom in to Margaret

...you were persuaded to go back to being a cookery editor.

Margaret v/o: I went back to women's magazines, which was the most exciting period.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: The editor of Woman's Day was very, very interested in food. And I was able to do the most amazing - they thought I was marvellous. They told the world that they'd got Margaret Fulton. And Margaret Fulton was going to do these marvellous things for them.

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Pages of Fulton's cookbook

Margaret v/o: And Margaret Fulton did a lot of lovely things.

Robin o/s: And in the process...

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Woman's Day magazine cover

...you became a household name. Why do you...

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Margaret

...think your cookery pages were so popular?

Margaret sync: I think, I could - when I answer the - when I sort of think about what made people like what I did, when I was approached by Paul Hamlyn...

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Photo [2S] Margaret and Paul Hamlyn

Margaret v/o: ...to do my first book, I said...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...you know what - because I was very sophisticated and I knew everything, and I'd written for markets. I knew about marketing. I said "What market will I write it to?" And this very nice book editor said to me, "Margaret, if you write for yourself, if it's going to be a success, it'll be a great success. If you write for a market, you don't know."

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Cover of cookbook

Margaret v/o: I realised that in writing the book for my family...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...it was writing the book for a lot of families. Because there was something, there was something in it for everybody. I think the Australians responded to this enormous excitement that I was feeling about food. And they were feeling it too.

Robin o/s: So you were translating in fact what professional cooks were doing, and the way food was moving, into something that could be done in the family kitchen?

Margaret sync: That's right. Yes - in my book, in that first book, it was quite revolutionary in because I was learning from my French friends, how the French did it. Then, at that point I was also learning Greek dishes. I was also...

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Photo [MS] Margaret on steps of aeroplane

Margaret v/o: ...travelling a lot. So I would go to a country and I would be introduced...

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Photo [MWS] Margaret at restaurant table

...to the best cooks and the best dishes. I was really bringing...

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Photo [2S] Margaret with Indian chef

...the world to Australia. The professional cooks' world and also the domestic cooks'...

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Photo [CU] Can. Zoom out to Margaret and man holding can over frying pan

...world. Because Australia had been starved ...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...of the international feeling about food.

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Magazine article about Margaret

Robin o/s: That first book was really a phenomenal success, wasn't it? Did its success surprise you?

Margaret v/o: I think...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: I sort of came - I was in a state of shock, of course, when the first royalty cheque arrived. And all of my friends were so excited. Because they'd never seen so much money. Or they'd never seen a cheque for so much money. And they said "Oh, isn't that marvellous, Margaret, you know, now you can buy a refrigerator." And I though, oh. Because you see up until that point, I had had an icebox. An icebox, you know, with a big block - the ice man used to come every morning, put this big block of ice in the thing. And it would keep my butter just the way I liked it. It would keep my milk the way I liked it. I thought, oh why do a need a refrigerator? Is this what I'm working for? I couldn't, I thought, oh if this is success, a refrigerator, really is it all that important. And then there was a marvellous exhibition came to Australia from Scandinavia. And I had visited this artist's studio in Finland. And it was beautiful bird. It was a big curlew, made out of...

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Curlew in Margaret's lounge room

Margaret v/o: ...little tiny wee beads. And it was in the running position.

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Curlew in Margaret's lounge room. Pan down bird

And inside were a set of clocks, all set at quarter past 12. But for some reason, the magic of this bird...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...the magic of the thing. That's what I felt I was - I wanted magic. If this is success, it had to be something wonderful.

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Photo [MWS] Margaret in TV studio in front of camera

Robin o/s: That success brought a lot of television work that's lasted right up to the present day.

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Photo [MCU] Margaret demonstrating meal preparation

Do you enjoy it?

Margaret: Oh, it's, it's like being the straight man...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...to a comedian or something. There's always someone else that really is wanting to be noticed, too. And I suppose I didn't like, I don't really like sharing the limelight.

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Frying pan with meat being stirred

Margaret v/o: That's one way of putting it.

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Excerpt from TV program. Margaret and TV personality in TV kitchen [6 shots]

Super: The Midday Show, 1994

Margaret: ...water chestnuts are lovely and crispy. And that's why that's quite enough flavouring for that.

Hinch: And if you get any and you don't use them all, you can put some water in that and keep them in the fridge for a few days. True.

Margaret: True. Oh, it's like teaching your grandma to suck eggs, isn't it?

FX: Audience laughter

Hinch: I've known her for thirty years, thirty years we've been together.

Margaret: Yes, so Derryn can take things from me and I can take things from Derryn.

Robin o/s: Casting your mind back...

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Margaret

...now to where your career got started, a lot of other women trained as home...

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Archival Margaret demonstrating cooking [4 shots]

Super: ABC-TV, 1967

...economists. How come you were the one who emerged as the guru of Australian cooking?

Margaret v/o: When I decided I wanted to cook, or I liked cooking, it wasn't an attractive, it wasn't an attractive proposition. And the people with real brains were doing the things that - you know, people with real brains did.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: The people who were doing what I were doing, were the also-rans. You weren't as, you weren't considered as bright. And very often you weren't. I think that it's just marvellous that it was that way, because it left the coast clear for me to sort of rip ahead, because I was sort of half bright. And knew what I wanted to do.

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Photo [MCU] Margaret

Robin o/s: And yes, you did seem to approach...

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Photo [MS] Margaret in demonstration kitchen

...everything you did with great confidence.

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Margaret

Where do you think that confidence came from?

Margaret: Oh, being loved from the time I was a minute old. Being adored by everyone that surrounded me. That gives you confidence. You know, when I say adored, it didn't stop them tying me up under a bed, my brothers and sisters. Or doing all kinds of funny things to me. But basically, I think love is so important. And gives you a feeling of self-confidence and assurance. And everything that you, everything you do when people love you, is all right. And so I'd started my life that way.

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Photo [CU] Margaret tossing salad

Margaret v/o: And so that anything that I took on, I always felt I was going to be triumphant.

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Photo [MS] Margaret holding her cookbook

Robin o/s: After your first book, you went on to publish very successfully with Paul Hamlyn ...

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Margaret

... until you were involved in a publishing scheme that brought you some grief. What happened?

Margaret sync: Well, yes Paul Hamlyn at one time...

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Photo [BCU] Paul Hamlyn

Margaret v/o: ... he got various people to do different things. So somebody would write a book on soups, and somebody would write a book on salads, and somebody would write a book on ...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ... such and such. And this came out, under the Sainsbury label.

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CU Margaret's cookbooks

Margaret v/o: When it came to Australia, he wanted me to put the Margaret Fulton, have the Margaret Fulton label on it. And I was explained...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...that this was imprimatur. "It's your imprimatur, Margaret, on these books." And I said, "Well I can do my own books." And they said but this is - you know, and because it was part of a seven book deal, I didn't really want to do it. But Paul and I, by this time, had become very close, very good friends. And I - it's like being married to someone. You can't say no...

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Photo [BCU] Paul Hamlyn. Tilt up to Margaret

Margaret v/o: ... you have to say yes. And I said yes. But one of the people who had contributed to one of these books...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ... said "These are my recipes and it's got Margaret Fulton's name on it." And then some eager beaver from Australian ABC thought, ah, we've got - because I'd been squeaky clean you see. I was everybody's darling. But somebody thought, "Right, let's get her." And my life was made very miserable by this person who convinced, I think, I suppose the ABC...

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Chillis, knives and fruit on table

Margaret v/o: ...that he was on to something hot. And you know, suddenly to become...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ... everybody's darling to become the villain of the piece, it was sort of, took me a bit by storm. Also, because I didn't feel that I was the villain of the piece. It was a - I understood - it was a publishing thing. People in publishing said "Margaret, this is an imprimatur. Yes, it's done all of the time." But it didn't help me. I didn't write another book for, I think, ten years. I couldn't face anything.

Robin o/s: Could you tell me...

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Photo [MWS] Margaret and husband outside Berida Manor

... now about the time you and your second husband ran a luxury resort at Berida Manor in Bowral? How did that venture go?

Margaret v/o: It was a great hit.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: But a terrible, but a good thing happened to us. Malcolm Fraser, who was the Prime Minister at the time, he was entertaining the Commonwealth Heads of Government.

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Pamphlet showing Berida Manor

Margaret v/o: But the place they chose as a retreat for these thirteen Prime Ministers...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ... heads of government, was Berida Manor. Well we weren't - you know, here we'd been open two months, and here was the most important group of people ever ...

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Hand-written note to Margaret

Margaret v/o: ... to be entertained in ...

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Hand-written note to Margaret

... Australia, were coming to my doorstep.

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Margaret

Margaret sync: And then a dreadful thing happened. It was the time of what became quite famous, the Hilton bombing. And there was a bomb, you know, dropped in a garbage outside the Hilton Hotel. So there was this enormous scare.

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Newspaper article about bombing

Dissolve to:

Margaret v/o: And it made an enormous difference...

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Newspaper article about Berida Manor at time of bombing

... to the whole thing that should have been a pleasant retreat. We were covered by ...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: ... the special police. And it was a nightmare. In the kitchen it was a nightmare, because different Prime Ministers, they would have tasters, or somebody making sure the food wasn't poisoned, and making sure the food wasn't a whole lot things.

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Hand-written notes to Margaret in book

Margaret v/o: It's an enormous responsibility to have the heads of you know, thirteen countries, and their wives, and their entourage, in your care.

Robin o/s: And...

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Margaret

... what happened to the venture at Berida Manor? Did it become very successful, what was the story?

Margaret: Ah, it is very interesting about Berida Manor, but after the heads of government had been there, I went into a state of shock. I couldn't believe that I -- that I went away on a, I went away on a cruise with my husband -- that I didn't want to go back. And I couldn't understand why I felt so shocked.

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Photo [WS] Exterior of Berida Manor

Margaret v/o: It's a funny thing. You think, yes, I made a success of this. But, I don't want to do it again, thank you.

Robin o/s: You were in...

00:23:59
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Margaret

... this venture with your husband. Was he happy to give it up when you felt that way?

Margaret sync: My husband loved the whole Berida Manor thing.

00:24:09
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Photo [CU] Margaret's husband

Margaret v/o: But he wasn't terribly good at it. He was...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: I should hate to say it, but you know, when Fawlty Towers came out, some people used to say "Oh, he's just like Fawlty Towers," you know. And I think...

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Photo [MS] Margaret and husband

Margaret v/o: ... it was good that he came with me and got out of it.

Robin o/s: That second marriage also ended in divorce...

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Photo [CU] Margaret and third husband

... but your third marriage was happier. Why do you think that was?

Margaret v/o: For the first time in my life...

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Margaret

Margaret sync: I had companionship, and I had the kind of things that some women have all their lives. I had for eight wonderful, wonderful years, with a mentally alert person, with a person who enjoyed things that I enjoyed. Enjoyed travel and enjoyed theatre. And so I had eight years of life of going how it should be. And I'm terribly happy about that. The only thing, he smoked Gitane cigarettes, and then one day he was coughing, and the next day he...

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Photo [BCU] Margaret's husband

Margaret v/o: ...you know, was being told, sixteen weeks to live. And yes, he died. But it was...

00:25:21
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Margaret

Margaret sync: ... a very - it was a very happy time because it reassured me that relationships are important and are good. And it's all part of it. Until that I think I'd sort of think oh, it's not the best thing in life.

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Margaret chopping vegetables

Margaret v/o: The best thing in life is working and writing recipes, and chopping and stirring and all of those things. But I learnt that...

00:25:43
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Margaret

Margaret sync: ...life shared with someone, the right person, is simply great.

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Margaret walking up steps of house with dog

Margaret sync: Hello, Coco

Robin o/s: Do you feel you've had a good life?

00:25:57
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Margaret with dogs next to fish van

Margaret v/o: Oh, I've had the best life. I've had a wonderful life. Imagine, imagine how I feel, you know. I've been able to tell people how to make things work.

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Margaret

Fade to black at end of sync speech

Margaret sync: I've been able to tell people how to be happy. I've been able to tell people to look around the corner, think of what the little people Chinese people eat, and think of what they eat in India. I've sort of felt that people have come with me on this marvellous adventure that I've been on. And gosh, what is a good life but that.

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Credits fade up over picture of room. Margaret enters carrying tray.
Interviewer
ROBIN HUGHES

Director of Photography
PAUL REE

Sound Recordist
TIM PARROTT

00:26:45
126

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Sound Post Production
MICHAEL GISSING
DIGITAL CITY STUDIOS

Promotions Manager
MICHELLE O'RIORDAN

Production Supervisor
IAN ADKINS

00:26:55
127

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Production Accountant
JANETTE GOULD

Production Co-ordinator
JULIE ADAMS

Online Editor
MATTHEW EDMOND
VISUALEYES

00:26:59
128

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Archival Sources
Margaret Fulton
ABC TV Footage Sales
Filmworld
Nine Network
AGL Library
Australian Consolidated Press

00:27:03
129

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Researched by
LINDA KRUGER

Produced and Directed by
ROBIN HUGHES and
LINDA KRUGER

Executive Producer
MEGAN McMURCHY

Made in association with SBS TV

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00:27:07
130

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A National Interest Program
Film Australia Ltd
© MCMXCII

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00:27:15
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