Australian Biography - Bruce Dawe

Shot Vision Audio In Point
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Film Australia sequence ending in Film Australia logo.

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Music

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Australian Biography opening sequence

Music

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Bruce sitting in kitchen

Bruce sync: This poem is about my mother and her desire to settle down in one place at one particular time, and have real roots. And the extent to which it wasn't possible, because there was always somebody, usually the father, to come and say let's move on somewhere else. And the poem deals with the fact that she always had, I'm sure in thinking back on it, this sense that waiting for the other shoe to drop, for the order to come.

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Archive footage of truck loaded with household goods pulling into dirt road. Children sit on top of truck cabin. Trees and field in b/g

Fade up on super:

Drifters

FX: Truck engine

Bruce v/o: 'One day soon he'll tell her it's time to start packing. And the kids will yell "truly", and get wildly excited for no reason.

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Bruce

Bruce sync: And the brown kelpie pup will start dashing about, tripping everyone up. And she'll go out to the vegetable patch, and pick all the green tomatoes from the vines. And notice how the eldest girl is close to tears, because she was happy here. And how the youngest girl is beaming because she wasn't. And the first thing she'll put on the trailer will be the bottling set she never unpacked from Grovedale. And when the loaded...

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Moving shot past house with veranda and trees

Bruce v/o: ...ute bumps down the drive, past the blackberry canes with their last shrivelled fruit, she won't even ask why they're leaving...

FX: Muted engine
Birds

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Loaded truck drives through countryside on dirt road.

Bruce v/o: ...this time. Or where they're heading for. She'll only remember how, when they came here she held out her hands, bright with berries. The first of the season. And said...

FX: Engine
Birds

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Bruce

Fade up on super:

Bruce Dawe
Born 1930
Poet

Bruce sync: ..."Make a wish, Tom. Make a wish."

FX: Dog barking

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Photo of Bruce as a young child. Hold on CU child's face

Robin v/o: As well as moving about a lot, your father was often away from home. Why was he away so much?

Bruce v/o: Well, sometimes he was looking for work, and sometimes I think he was just in ...

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Bruce. Move slowly in to MCU Bruce

Bruce sync: ...a disagreeable sort of mode with, as far as Mum was concerned. And again, there were all these things washed over me, because I was too young to know. And in one sense, too young to care. But I realise, looking back on it, how much there must have been a lot of tension there, for this to happen so often. But brother was always there, and he was the other...

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Photo of Bruce as a young boy standing next to an older man.

Bruce v/o: ...constant sort of fixed point in my early memories, along with Mum, and ...

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Photo of young dark haired woman standing in front of flowering bush. Photo against black background

Bruce v/o: ...the younger of two sisters.

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Bruce

Robin o/s: What kind of work did you father do?

Bruce sync: He was a farm labourer, so given that I ...

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Archive footage of farm labourers moving bundles of hay with pitchforks

Bruce v/o: ...was born as the Depression ...

FX: Birds

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Archive footage of farm labourers loading bundles of hay onto horse drawn wagon with pitchforks. Men stand on top of hay wagon while other throw hay onto top of pile.

Bruce v/o: ...started to deepen, in 1930, those years of my memory of him ...

FX: Birds

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Archive footage of countryside

Bruce v/o: ...of course were the years when he was finding it hardest anyway, to find work. So he went looking for work. And later on...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ... then my brother went looking for work too, and brought home - I don't know what my father did with the limited money he had, but...

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Photo of young man carrying a child on his shoulder

Bruce v/o: ...my brother certainly didn't spend it on himself. He brought it home to keep the family going.

Robin v/o: Your father had various ...

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Bruce

Robin o/s: ...enterprises too, didn't he?

Bruce sync: Yeah, well they were kind of joint enterprises in a way. And you know, they planned at one stage to have a fox farm, breed foxes for their skins. In the end I think they got rid of the foxes anyway.

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Archive footage of gathering of men in suits and hats

Bruce v/o: And they, at a later stage...

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Archive footage of women walking across grass toward fence where other people are gathered. Man crosses in f/g

Bruce v/o: ...had a horse they'd invested in. I think a bit of a sort of a ...

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Horses hooves and legs running across ground

Bruce v/o: ...sway back nag actually, but it was called Pink Lady, and they had great hopes for it winning...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ... back, redeeming the family fortunes. It never did.

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Archive footage of wheat fields

Fade up on super:

Little Red Fox

Dissolve to:

FX: Crow

Bruce v/o: 'My dad, he didn't live with us. He lived out in a shed, cooked his own...

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Photo of Bruce's father

Bruce v/o: ... potato chips, lonely went to bed. He was handsome, with high cheekbones. His eyes were steel blue. The stories ...

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Bruce reading from page

Bruce sync: ...he told were mostly lies, but he made you wish them true.

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Photo of chain. Move up chain to see man holding pet fox

Bruce v/o: He had a little red fox cub, and kept it on a chain. It ran around in circles, all day long, pain, pain, pain. He'd sit it on his shoulder and walk around the place.

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Bruce

Bruce sync: And even mother couldn't keep a smile from her face. Run, little red fox, run, run, run. Run, little red fox, run. One day he looked at me and said, "We all want to be free. The wild birds, the tame birds, that fox cub and me." He took the chain from around its neck. "You're on your own," he said. The fox cub ran and ran around in circles, finally dropped dead. Oh, how he wept when he picked it up, oh how he broke down then.

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Photo of man holding pet fox in his hands

Bruce v/o: "You see how it is, son. See how it is. With foxes and with men." Run, little red fox, run, run, run. Run, little red fox, run.'

Robin v/o: How old were you when you wrote your first...

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Bruce

Robin o/s: ...poem?

Bruce sync: Well, I started writing as a young kid. The younger of my two older sisters...

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Photo of dark haired young woman smiling. Move down to CU young boy sticking his tongue out

Bruce v/o: ....was a very talented writer I think. She published some poems, I think, in the Herald newspaper. And the general support of the family was there all the time. They thought Bruce was always supposed to be, you know, a clever young fellow. Not half as clever as I...

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Photo of woman holding baby with young boy kneeling next to her

Bruce v/o: ...think they thought he was. But I wasn't going to disappoint them or disillusion them about that.

Robin v/o: So where did you...

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Bruce

Robin o/s: ...come in the family?

Bruce sync: I came fourth. So that was the end of, that was the end of the line. But I was in fact 20 plus years younger than my brother and sisters.

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Photo of two young woman standing beside bikes

Bruce v/o: So they stood as, more or less, aunts...

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Photo of young boy sitting in side car of motor bike. Young man sits on bike

Bruce v/o: ...and uncle to me. And kindly ones...

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Photo of young boy wearing overalls and white shirt. Photo against black backdrop

Bruce v/o: ...at that. So I was very lucky. I didn't have any sibling rivalry, because I had no siblings...

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Photo of young boy sitting on motorbike

Bruce v/o: ...in that sense.

Robin v/o: Was your mother ambitious for you?

Bruce v/o: I'm sure she...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...was. I was the one person that had an education beyond primary school. Most of them didn't finish primary school. I don't think my brother finished primary school. They were pulled out of school, as so many people were, at an early age, because of the necessities of family...

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Archive footage of schoolboys crossing road in front of bus

Bruce v/o: ...finances. But I was still the person who had gone to high school, which is an enormous jump...

FX: Muted voices

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Archive footage of students in class room. Students raise their hands

Bruce v/o: ...from people who hadn't finished primary school.

Robin v/o: But you dropped out before you finished high school. Can you...

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Bruce. Move into CU Bruce

Robin o/s: ...remember what precipitated that? Given Given that your mother was wanting you to go on, and you were a clever young fellow who wasn't going to disappoint anyone, why did you drop out just then?

Bruce sync: Well, I'd had some sort of difference of agreement you might say with my maths teacher. And I remember storming out of the classroom and being ordered to come back and close the door properly which I, being an obedient person, came back and did. But that was my last class. And I went home, and on my way I caught the tram home, and I stopped off at a lending library to take out some Ellery Queen...

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Hand pulls open drawer of library cards

Bruce v/o: ...books. That was my sort of act of emancipation, was to read some Ellery Queen mystery stories. So...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...that's how I left school. And I went home and proudly declared that I'd sort of finished with school. And I got a job then in a lawyer's office.

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Archive footage looking down at interior of office with people working

Bruce v/o: And at the end of a year, the ...

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Move across various items scattered on desk top to filling cabinet

Bruce v/o: ...junior partner said to me "Well, you don't seem to be sort of making that much progress, would you like a week's pay, or a week's notice?" And I said "I'll settle for a week's pay."

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Bruce

Bruce sync: So it was - I like, I always believe in sort of quick finishes, you know.

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Photo of Bruce as a young man

Bruce v/o: So I took a whole succession of different jobs, most of which for one reason or another I didn't last too long at.

Robin v/o: Were you living at home...

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Bruce. Move back to MWS Bruce

Robin o/s: ...with your mother during this time?

Bruce sync: Well, some of the times I was living with Mum, sometimes I wasn't. When she went to the final trip to the hospital I was still living with her. And other times I wasn't. But I'd had a big disagreement with her. She thought - this is long after the fox farm kind of fantasy - that breeding Pekes was the way to go.

Robin o/s: Breeding what?

Bruce sync: Breeding Pekes, Pekinese dogs. And we didn't have the money or the facilities for that kind of activity. And I remember coming home, I'd worked hard, this is Public Works, labouring work, at a place called Rosanna, out of Melbourne. Caught a train into Melbourne, then a train another forty minutes out to Boronia, and then a half mile or a mile walk from the station. And I'd find that there was no tea for me, when I got home at seven o'clock at night. And I remember...

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Blurry photo of woman holding Pekinese dog

Bruce v/o: ...saying to her one day, "It's either me or the Pekes," and she said "Well, it's the Pekes." And I left the following morning.

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Bruce

Bruce sync: So with some - but I didn't lose contact with the family. And I'd go and visit them. So it wasn't as though I was never seen or heard from again. But it's just that for a young bloke, I suppose I would have been round about - oh, I don't know - eighteen, nineteen, my temper got the better of me. And it was just as well I suppose that it did, because had I not been in Melbourne, I would never have gone to the university.

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Archive footage students walking up stairs and into stone building

Bruce v/o: I went to night school, I did matric., I went to university and the rest of my life has been different from there.

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Bruce

Bruce sync: Although I was tempted quite often to leave the studying at night school, after the day's works, I was always implored by my night school teacher to come back, often tearfully, and I always came back. A woman's tears, I'm a sucker for them. Always was. So I came back, I finished off the matriculation, and then went to university the following year.

Robin o/s: So although you'd committed yourself very eagerly, to do this adult matriculation, you almost dropped out of that.

Bruce sync: Oh yes, sure.

Robin o/s: This dropping out, again, looking back to it with the wisdom of hindsight, was it always just that you were fed up, or was it also a little bit that you wondered whether you could do it?

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Bruce. Continuation of last shot

Bruce sync: I suspect a bit of both, Robin. In one sense, I guess that's always there. I've never been over confident about my capacity for taking on new things. So you know, I think that was part of it. It was also that if your working life is among guys who are just sort of - well, guys who have never been to high school for example, and you're aware that you're using some kind of camouflage to keep in with them, and to learn to operate within their sort of expectations, and then you have to switch off every evening to become a person who's studying French and studying English literature at matriculation level, then especially in those days - I'm talking about the early 1950s - it was a bit of a sort of, a bit of a switch you had to do on a sort of, on a weekly basis.

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Photo of group of students walking across lawn. Old building in b/g

Robin v/o: You went to university immediately after you matriculated...

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Photo of group of women and men. Building in b/g

Robin v/o: ... did you? How was that?

Bruce: Oh, it was great. Early fifties. I was mostly mixing with people who'd gone to sort of posh...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...colleges and top high schools, rather than drop outs from high school. But they were very magnanimous. And going - I mean I was lucky, because I could have met a time where other people, writers like Philip Martin, Evan Jones, Vin Buckley, Chris Wallace-Crabbe, were all there or recently been graduated, or already teaching there. And they were universally magnanimous, universally generous. And I could have probably gone at some other time to some other place and found myself seen as - because I did write while I was there and publish while I was there - as a threat, or as a pest, or a bit of both. In fact I met none of that. And that was terribly important to me, and still is. So I wrote these kind of - those prose sketches, the Joey Cassidy series that Penguin brought out, mostly - really as a kind of farewell to an idiom which I expected I was...

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Archive footage of students in university classroom

Bruce v/o: ...going to leave behind. That is a sort of working class idiom and the working class background I came from and that I'd ...

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Archive footage row of university students sitting at desk and taking notes

Bruce v/o: ...worked in.

Robin: Were you surprised when you failed?

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Bruce

Bruce sync: No, not at all. No, I knew I was failing. And I always remembered - I guess those lines from Richard II where he says 'I wasted time and now doth time waste me.' I knew I was for the chopper, and I was quite philosophic about it. I didn't hold the university to account for it. It was simply my own fault. I'd...

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Photo of Bruce as a young man

Bruce v/o: ...you know, read widely but not well. So that was the end of that.

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Bruce

Robin o/s: And when you left university and you started on a series of jobs again, what happened for you?

Bruce sync: Well, I did handyman gardening, although I'm not much of a handy man and not much more of a gardener. But I did that for a while. And then I joined the Post Office as a postman, in around where I lived.

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Archive footage postman picking up mailbag and exiting frame right

Bruce: So I was able to go to the local post office, throw off my mail in the day, and...

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Archive footage postman walking down street with mail

Bruce v/o: ...take it on a walk round. And I enjoyed that very much for a couple of years. It started early and finished...

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Archive footage young boy takes mail from postman

Bruce v/o: ...about half past four, with a lay off in the middle. So it was kind of a longish day, and it was really...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...enjoyable, but not, as it were, doing anything else. I suppose I wanted companionship more than anything, so I thought I'd join the services.

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Archive footage of soldiers doing drill with guns

Soldiers sync: One, two, three.

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Archive footage of soldiers marching on parade ground

Fade up on super:

Weapons Training

FX: Marching

Bruce v/o: 'And When I say eyes right, I want to hear those eyeballs click. And the gentle pitter-patter of falling dandruff. You there...

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Bruce reading.

Fade to black

Bruce sync: ...what's the matter, why are you looking at me? Are you a queer? Look to your front. If you had one more brain it'd be lonely. What are you laughing at, you in the back row with the unsightly fat between your elephant ears. Open that drain you call a mind and listen. Remember first the cockpit drill. When you go down, be sure the old crown jewels are safely tucked away. What could be more distressing than to hold off with a boost from your trusty weapon, a mob of the little yellows undefined back home, because of your position, you chances of turning the key in the ignition considerably reduced. All right now, suppose for the sake of argument you've got a number one blockage, and a brand new pack of Charlies are coming at you. You can smell their rotten fish sauce breath hot on the back of your stupid neck. All right, now what are you going to do about it? That's right, grab and check the magazine man. It's not a woman's tit, worse luck, or you'd be set. Too late, you nit, they're on you and your tripes around your neck, you've copped the bloody lot just like they said. And you know what you are? You're dead, dead, dead.'

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Fade up on photo of Bruce in uniform

Robin v/o: During the Vietnam War, your opposition was very public, very strongly articulated. How did that sit with your, with the people that you were working with in the air force...

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Bruce

Robin o/s: ... day by day?

Bruce sync: Nobody ever worried a bit. I mean the air force, of the three services, is the most junior, of course. And also, the most apolitical.

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Photo of Bruce as a young man

Bruce v/o: It - they didn't worry a continental. I mean every RAAF library had copies of my books. There was an...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...item in the Sydney Morning Herald once which said 'Antiwar poet goes to war.' Which wasn't true, I wasn't going to war, I was only going to Malaysia. They didn't worry a bit. Had it been the navy or the army, I would have probably been hauled over the coals. But no, no, they didn't take offence. I was winning a few prizes and so on, which helped to perhaps redeem me. But I don't think in most cases they read the poems. Or if they did, they thought well, you know, poetry being what it is, who else will read this anyway. So it never in any way reflected on my sort of relationship with either officers or other air force personnel.

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Archive footage of soldiers walking through frame dragging bag.

Fade up on super:

Homecoming

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Archive footage soldiers carry stretcher with wounded man through jungle landscape

Bruce v/o: 'All day, day after day, they're bringing them home.

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Archive footage soldiers carrying stretcher down muddy road

Bruce v/o: They're picking them up...

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Archive footage soldiers lifting stretcher onto helicopter

Bruce v/o: ...those they can find and bringing them home. They're bringing ...

FX: Helicopter

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Archive footage group of Asian children and adults standing behind low wire fence

Bruce v/o: ...them in, piled on the hulls of grants in trucks in...

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Archive footage soldier shutting door to ambulance

Bruce v/o: ...convoys.

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Bruce reading

Bruce sync: They're zipping them up in green plastic bags, they're tagging them now in Saigon, in the mortuary coolness, they're giving them names. They're rolling them out of the deep freeze lockers, on the tarmac at Tun Song, the noble jets are ...

FX: Jet engine

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Archive footage looking out the back of plane at runway as plane takes off and moves up to aerial view of runway

Bruce v/o: ...whining like hounds. They are bringing them home. Curly heads, kinky hairs, crew cuts, balding non-coms. They're high now, high, and higher ...

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Archive footage. Aerial shot looking down at houses and narrow bridge over river

Bruce v/o: ...over the land of steaming Chow Mein. Their shadows are tracing the...

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Archive footage. Aerial shot looking down at houses and curve of river

Bruce v/o: ...blue curve of the Pacific with sorrowful...

FX: Plane engine

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Bruce reading. Move into CU Bruce.

Fade to black

Bruce sync: ...quick fingers, heading south, heading east, home, home, home and the coasts swing upward. The whole ridiculous curvatures of earths. The knuckles, hills, the mangrove swamps, the desert emptiness. In their sterile housing, they tilt towards these like skiers, taxiing in on the long runways, the howl of their homecoming rises, surrounding them like their last moments. The MASH, the splendour. Then fading at length as they move on to small towns, where dogs in the frozen sunset raise muzzles in mute salute. And on to cities in whose wide web of suburbs, telegrams tremble like leaves from a wintering tree. And the spider ? swings in his bitter geometry. They're bringing them home now, too late, too early.'

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Fade up on photo of Bruce in uniform standing next to woman in bridal outfit

Robin v/o: During your years in the air force, you settled down and got married. How did you meet your wife?

Bruce v/o: Well, she was the switchboard operator at the air force base that I was posted to in Toowoomba.

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Bruce. Move into CU Bruce

Bruce sync: I was one of those guys who had to relieve on switch at weekends. I don't know that I was very good as a relief switch operator, but at least I kind of, I met her then, and I liked her very much. And so...

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Photo of Bruce as young man. Move to CU woman in bridal outfit

Bruce v/o: ...we kept pretty quiet while we were on base, but eventually decided to get married. Yeah. It was all in the first year, actually. And it's been, of course, a great thing.

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Photo of smiling woman's face. Move down to CU baby in woman's arms

Bruce v/o: Because she's both a good critic and been a wonderful wife. And a wonderful mother to the kids.

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Photo of Bruce and his family

Bruce v/o: And they think the world of her too. So again, I've been terribly lucky. I mean one...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...looks around and sees that it's not always the case. In fact, less and less the case. So there's nothing to say that I deserved any better than lots of other people who didn't get as good.

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Photo of Bruce standing in middle of class room full of students

Robin v/o: The stability that had come into your life allowed you to complete your degree and become a teacher.

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Photo of Bruce and students

Robin v/o: Has teaching English Literature at university affected your poetry?

Bruce v/o: The very fact of being a teacher means that you're a metaphor user.

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Bruce

Bruce sync: Your metaphors, your analogies, the inevitable bridges that teachers make between their experience and...

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Photo of students. Move to see Bruce standing in group and talking

Bruce v/o: ...that of students, so that some traffic can sort of go both ways across whatever dark and troubled waters there are.

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Bruce

Bruce sync: And so in a sense, I often thought using metaphors in the process of teaching, I was possibly running the risk of exhausting my sort of, my reserve bank of metaphors and images and so on. But the other thing is that I think you get a lot back. Incidentally, you get back the forced education that you have to give, as - you have to get it as well as give. And I think that was important for me, because I think I may have pointed out before, I was undisciplined as a sort of reader in my early, in my teenage years. And university studies forced me to read things and think more consecutively than I would have otherwise. And then teaching also forces on people, however undisciplined they are, a certain sort of formal requirements. And that again I think was good for me. It kept a bit of - if I can use the term - tone in my intellectual muscles.

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Hand writing words onto white paper. Move up to CU Bruce

FX: Radio

Robin v/o: They physical act of writing a poem, do you have a particular way of going about it?

Bruce v/o: Pretty haphazard actually. I take it as it comes. So I'll try something out. And I may be sitting at...

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Bruce sitting at table and writing

Bruce v/o: ...the dining room table - I've never had a study. So even when I did studies as a formal sort of activity, I did them either in the kitchen or in the dining-room. And...

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Bruce

Bruce sync: ...the television's usually on, or the radio may be on. And it was often when the kids were home, activities. And they seemed to me to be a natural, and nobody ever got shushed or told the master is creating or that sort of nonsense. So things went on with their activities and dogs and cats wanted to be fed and tickled under the chin and so on. And you accepted that as part of the free flow of demands that you had to meet.

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Hand writing words onto white paper

Bruce v/o: For me, poetry is a kind of - is a common sort of daily activity. And...

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Bruce. Move into CU Bruce.

Fade to black

Bruce sync: ...even when it comes to recognition, I always think you have to go - you have to leave the recognition, whatever praise or condemnation you've received, and go out into the workaday world and justify the rest of your life. So life comes first, art comes second. And I think that's the way it always has to be for me.

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Fade up on Bruce sitting at table with book in his hands. Move to CU Bruce

Fade up on super:

Going

Fade to black

Bruce sync: This poem's about my mother-in-law, and the circumstances of her death. I loved her very much, and the poem's called 'Going.' It is just about the way she died at a barbecue. And I think it was the way, if she had to choose a way, this is the way she would have preferred to go, with her family and grand kids around her. 'Mum, you would have loved the way you went. One moment at a barbecue in the garden, the next falling out of your chair, hamburger in a one hand, and a grandson yelling. Zip, the heart's roller blind rattling up and you in an old dress, quite still, flown already from your dearly loved Lyndon. Leaving only a bruise like a blue kiss on the side of your face. The seedbeds incredibly tidy, grass daunted by drought. You'd have loved it Mum, you big spender. The relatives' eyes narrowed with grief, swelling the rooms with their clumsiness. The reverberation of tears, the endless cuppas, and groups revolving, blinded as moths. The joy of your going. The laughing reminiscences snagged on the pruned roses in the bright glowing day.'

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Fade up on Bruce

Robin o/s: Do you think that some of the strength, and particularly the humour of your poetry, comes from the fact that you won't take the whole thing too seriously?

Bruce sync: That could be so, I think. I mean I - I think it also matches up with something in the Australian temperament which says it's a big country and we're kind of thinly spread here. And epic voices and monumental kind of percussions are not really not going to be - amount to much. So let's try and do what we can with a certain sort of modesty, as to how much we'll achieve and whether, if we sound a note in Toowoomba, they'll hear it at Uluru. That's the kind of approach I have. And so it never dismays me to know that people say "Oh, look I've never heard of you." I say "That's fine, the world's full of people who have never heard of people, and it doesn't do either of them any kind of harm." And I appreciate that. That suits me fine. I like that approach.

Robin v/o: And yet, your poems...

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Photo of line of men holding books in front of them. Move across men to see Bruce standing with book in front of him

Robin v/o: ...have been enormously popular with the public. They've sold more than any other Australian poet since C. J. Dennis. Have you written them with the sense that...

00:24:49
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Bruce

Robin o/s: ...you're giving voice to the ordinary man's view of the world?

Bruce sync: Not consciously. I wrote, you know, I wrote as I wrote. I didn't have any sense of it having a resonance beyond my immediate concern with expressing myself.

00:24:58
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Looking up length of grassed driveway at side of house to Bruce opening door to shed. Cat on driveway

Bruce v/o: But you know, I don't believe for example that suburbia's just full of crummy little people who make love to their cars on Sunday morning.

00:25:16
105

Bruce

Bruce sync: I think that's a crazy sort of view of life. And it's a simplistic left wing view that I never did share. And as a person who never had a car, I suppose it might be easier for me to say. But I don't hold with those sort of derogatory sort of views of any class. I don't have, in one sense, a view that one class or another is by definition to be excluded from the human race.

00:25:25
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Purple flowers with bee sucking nectar

Fade up on super:

Homo Suburbiensis

Bruce v/o: 'One constant in a world of variables. A man alone in the evening in his patch of vegetables.

FX: Bee

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Man tending vegetable garden

Bruce v/o: And all the things he takes down with him there, where the easement runs along the back fence...

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Plants in garden with pitchfork stuck in ground. Wire fence in b/g

Bruce v/o: ...and the air smells of tomato vines, and the horse rasping tendrils of...

00:26:09
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Wooden fence with house in b/g

Bruce v/o: ...pumpkin flourish, clumsy whips. And their foliage sprawls...

00:26:14
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Bruce reading from book

Fade to black

Bruce sync: ...over the compost box, poising rampant upon the palings. He stands there lost in a green confusion. Smelling the smoke of somebody's rubbish burning, hearing vaguely the clatter of a dish in a sink that could be his. A dog, a kid, a far whisper of traffic, and offering up instead, not much. But as much as any man can offer. Time, pain, love, hate, age, war, death, laughter, fever.'

00:26:18
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Fade up on closing credits. Window of vision against black screen show Bruce opening gate and walking up path to house. Credits roll up through frame.

Interviewer
ROBIN HUGHES

Director of Photography
STEVE ISAAC

Sound Recordist
WARWICK FINLAY

FX: Dog barking/Car revving

FX: Traffic

00:26:50
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Continue credits roll.

Sound Post Production
MICHAEL GISSING
DIGITAL CITY STUDIOS

Promotions Manager
MICHELLE O'RIORDAN

Production Supervisors
GINA TWYBLE
IAN ADKINS

00:27:00
113

Continue credits roll.

Production Accountant
JANETTE GOULD

Production Coordinator
JULIE ADAMS

Online Editor
ROEN DAVIS
VISUALEYES

00:27:06
114

Continue credits roll.

Archival Sources

Bruce Dawe and Family
ABC TV Footage Sales
Film Australia
Filmworld

Edited and Researched by
LINDA KRUGER

00:27:10
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Credits continue.

Produced and Directed by
ROBIN HUGHES and
LINDA KRUGER

Executive Producers
SHARON CONNOLLY and
MEGAN McMURCHY

Made in association with SBS TV

Fade to black

00:27:16
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Fade up on Film Australia logo with the words "A National Interest Program," written above it and "Film Australia Ltd © MCMXCII

Fade to black

00:27:23
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